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莹723
03-23
莹723
Pilea peperomiodes, also known as the Chinese money plant, missionary plant, pancake plant, the pass-it-along plant and the UFO plant, has a dome of beautiful and unusual leaves that look like small lily pads. The Chinese money plant hails from southern China, and was first brought to the UK at the start of the twentieth century. It’s very easy to propagate, so circulated quietly among house plant enthusiasts (hence its nickname, the pass-it-along plant) but it was practically unheard until it became popular on social media a few years ago. Despite this, Pilea peperomiodes can be quite hard to get hold of – it’s best to go to a specialist house plant shop or online supplier. It’s also expensive, so if you have a friend with a plant, ask them to pot up one of the many babies that pop up around its base for you.
Pilea peperomiodes is an easy going plant that is good for beginners as it’s quite forgiving of neglect in terms of watering and feeding. But treat it well and it will reward you with fast growth, glossy green leaves and lots of babies at the base. Each Pilea peperomiodes grows slightly differently and your plant is likely to grow more upright as it matures. Older plants may produce tiny flowers. 1.How to grow Pilea peperomiodes Plant your Pilea peperomiodes in well drained compost and place in a warm, bright spot that’s not too sunny. Only water when the soil is beginning to dry out.
2.Where to grow Pilea peperomoides Pilea peperomiodes does best in a warm spot that doesn’t go below 12°C in winter. Put it somewhere bright – it will take a bit of direct sun, but don’t let it sit in midday or afternoon sun, as this will scorch the leaves.
3.How to plant Pilea peperomiodes There’s no need to take the plant out of it plastic pot when you bring your plant home (unless it’s root bound) – just put it inside a more decorative pot. Repot when root bound (you’ll see roots emerging out of the bottom of the pot). Plant in a mix of 2:1 soil-based compost (or peat-free, multi-purpose compost) and perlite, and make sure there are drainage holes at the bottom of the pot.
4.Caring for Pilea peperomiodes From spring to autumn, water regularly but allow the top few centimetres of the compost to dry out between waterings, and let any excess drain away afterwards – like most house plants, Pilea peperomiodes does not like sitting in cold, soggy compost. Water less in winter. Feed once a month with a weak or diluted house plant food. Wipe the leaves occasionally to keep them shiny and free from dust. You could mist the leaves, although this is not essential. The plant will naturally gravitate towards the light, giving it a tilted appearance, so rotate it every few days to maintain its mounded look. Repot in spring if the plant has become root bound.
5.How to propagate Pilea peperomiodes Pilea peperomiodes is very easy to propagate. It readily produces baby plants, known as offsets or pups, at its base – these can be carefully removed using a fork, and placed in an inch of water. A few weeks later, roots will have formed and you can pot up your new plants. They will grow fast.
6.Growing Pilea peperomiodes: problem solving Yellow or brown leaves at the base of the plant are normal – these are older leaves that die and drop off naturally. If yellow leaves are appearing all over the plant, it could be due to over- or under watering, so check your watering regime. Flopping, lacklustre leaves are due to under watering or over watering – check the soil to see which applies to your plant. Bending, curling leaves can be due to lack of light.
Pale leaves can be a sign of too much bright sunlight. Brown spots on the leaves are sunburn. Scale insect can be a problem – look for small brown lumps on the leaves. Gently wipe them away with cotton wool soaked in an insecticide based on fatty acids or plant oils. Act promptly as soon as you see them, as the problem can become widespread and affect the plant’s health. Powdery mildew can appear as white patches on the leaves. Remove the affected leaves and improve air circulation around the plant.
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莹723
03-18
莹723
Let's face it: We're all spending way more time at home these days, so it's more important than ever to make our backyards welcoming and special. And in northern climates, we need to make the most of those precious few warm weather months! Any backyard can be made a little cozier with our best tips and tricks for making your space more beautiful, useful and fun. And you don't need to spend a lot of money or hire a landscape designer to make over your backyard. With these simple ideas, you can create a restful oasis for you and your entire family (pets included).
These creative ideas will help you make home sweet home even sweeter! 1.Install a Fire Pit Heat things up this summer with a fire pit—either one you DIY or purchase. And don't forget to stock up on tons of s'mores fixings!
2.Welcome Hummingbirds to Your Garden We promise: It's so worth it! These little gems will make you smile as the zoom by and perform amazing aerial acrobatics! They beat their wings 50 times per minute and need to eat every 10 to 15 minutes, so providing them with a feeder helps supplement their diets. Choose a feeder that's easy to clean. Make your own nectar with 1/4 cup plain white sugar and one cup boiling water. There's no need to add red dye, which can harm the birds. Don't use honey or any other kinds of sugar, which contain too much iron. Cool the nectar, then fill your feeder, and wait for the show to begin.
3.Hang a Tree Swing A tree swing just says summertime! Watch how often you'll want to swing on it yourself!
4.Add Adirondack Chairs When it comes to lounging around, there's no better place to do it than in an Adirondack chair. That might be why we instantly equate the timeless accessory with summertime. Fill your patio or backyard up with multiple chairs, add some cozy blankets, and you'll be crowned the hostess of the year in no time.
5.Camp Out Under the Stars This summer just begs for a campout, and why not in your own backyard? It's inexpensive and easy! Map out a designated corner, roll out your sleeping bags, set the mood with string lights, and gather around the fire pit for roasting hot dogs and marshmallows. Even the grownups will have fun with this idea!
6.Repurpose a Stock Tank As a Pool The stock tank pool is the perfect way to cool off without the sweat (and expense) of an in-ground pool installation.
7.Build a Treehouse For those who would rather enjoy the backyard from a higher altitude, Treehouse Supplies offers easy building plans and materials. Come on, you know you want one!
8.Set Up a Potting Station Two metal trash cans and an old door make an inexpensive but totally functional (and adorable!) potting station.
9.Decorate a Chic Shed You can easily transform a basic backyard shed into a gorgeous space—complete with a barn quilt—in just 48 hours. Start by hanging checkered fabric by installing a rope across the peak of the shed and draping the fabric over using a staple gun to attach fabric to the walls (this shed required about 30 yard of fabric). Then hang an upholstered blue couch to create a unique seating area. And finish the shed by accessorizing with a bar cart, rug, and decorative baskets and plants.
10.DIY Sandbox A sandbox is a great place for kids of all ages to play. You can make one inexpensively with basic supplies from the hardware store!
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莹723
03-16
莹723
March is a busy time on the allotment – the days are lengthening and getting warmer, and the growing season is getting underway. Unfortunately that includes weeds and weeding is a very important job in early spring – get on top of them now and you’ll save yourself a lot of work later in the year.
You can also begin to sow and plant out – see our handy guide vegetable seeds to sow in March, but only do this if the weather is good. The weather can be fickle at this time of year – some days are warm and sunny, while others are still cold and if the weather is bad, wait until better weather is forecast. In the meantime, you could warm the soil on part of the plot for early sowings. Here are some key allotment jobs for March. 1.Weed your plot Dig out any problem weeds, especially perennial weeds – if you get on top of them now, they’ll be easier to control for the rest of the year. Hoe regularly to prevent annual weed seedlings growing.
2.Protect plants from pests Slugs can start to be a problem in warmer, wet weather, so take steps to protect your plants. Protect brassicas from hungry pigeons by covering them with fleece. Look out for grey mould and downy mildew on brassicas. You might spot some aphids, too. 3.Warm the soil and force early crops Cover beds with cloches or black plastic to warm the soil for early sowings. Encourage an early crop of strawberries in early summer by covering a row or two with a cloche. You can continue to force rhubarb, too, by covering it with a forcer or upturned dustbin or bucket.
4.Feed brassicas and fruit Feed cabbages and other brassicas with pelleted chicken manure or other nitrogen-rich fertiliser. You could also feed fruit trees and bushes, including cherries and plums.
5.Order or buy young veg plants Buy trays of young veg plants that you don’t have the time or space to grow from seed. Buy them by mail order or look for them at the garden centre.
6.Sow seeds Sow beetroot, broad beans, salads and Swiss chard direct into well-prepared soil. You could also make early sowings of carrots, peas, spinach and radishes if the soil is warm enough. You can also start off aubergines, chillies and peppers, plus tomatoes, under cover.
7.Get planting Planting onions in a row March is the last month for planting bare-root fruit trees and bushes. You can also plant bare-root strawberry runners, asparagus crowns and Jerusalem artichokes and plant out garlic, shallots and onion sets.
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莹723
03-10
莹723
If you’re tired of all those dull grays and browns in your garden, take heart: Spring is on the way! Actually, many annuals, perennials, and shrubs offer their finest shows in early spring. Many early bloomers are tough enough to handle a frost or two—or even a freakishly late spring snowstorm! But before you buy anything, read the plant tag or description so you’ll be sure you have the right conditions. For example, full sun means at least six hours of direct sunlight per day; part sun is about half that. Shade means that an area doesn’t get any direct sunlight. Don’t forget that if you’re planting shrubs or perennials, which come back every year, they must be suited to survive winters in your region. And pay attention to the mature size of plants in descriptions. A tiny six-inch potted plant eventually grows up, so give it plenty of space to spread so it won't crowd your other plantings or need moved. Here are some of the best early spring flowers for your garden. 1.Snowdrop Also called galanthus, these bulbs must be planted in the fall for an early springtime show, often appearing when snow is still on the ground in northern climates. Part shade to shade. 2. Pansy and Viola These charming annuals come in every shade of the rainbow, and their tiny “faces” are adorable. Plant violas and pansies in pots, baskets, and window boxes to brighten your early spring garden. Some types rebound in the fall or drop seeds to pop up again on their own next spring. Full sun. 3.Flowering Quince This beautiful shrub is one of the first to bloom in spring in shades of pink, red, or peach. It works well as a border planting. Newer varieties are thornless so they're easier to handle. Full sun. 4.Daffodil Every spring garden needs these sunny yellow blooms! They come in sizes ranging from six inches to two feet tall, and they bloom at different times from early to late spring. Plant in fall for spring blooms next year and for many seasons afterward. Group bulbs together in bunches for the most dramatic effect instead of planting single bulbs. Full sun. 5.Magnolia These early spring bloomers have gorgeous, almost unreal-looking blossoms. There are many different types of magnolias, some which are evergreen and some which are deciduous, which means they shed their leaves. Many deciduous types of magnolias bloom before they’ve even leafed out again. Because there are so many different types, make sure to select one that's suited to your USDA Hardiness zone. Full sun to part shade. 6.Grape Hyacinth The delicate grape-scented blooms, also called muscari, top out at four to six inches tall, so they look great in rock gardens or along the front of beds. Plant them in the fall for spring blooms next year. They naturalize readily, so every year you’ll have more of these dainty little flowers. Full sun to part sun. 7.Diascia The tiny open-faced blooms of this lesser-known cool season annual come in pleasing springtime shades of pink, peach, and white. Plant them with other spring bloomers in pots or as a ground cover. They fade when it gets hot. Full sun to part shade. 8.Fritillaria Bell-shaped flowers come in deep shades of purple, pink, white, and red on this lesser-known spring charmer. Plant fritallaria in the fall for dramatic blooms next spring. Full sun.
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莹723
03-07
莹723
There are lots of vegetable crops that can be sown in March, when the days are beginning to lengthen and become warmer. Some crops, such as chillies and tomatoes, need to be sown early in the year in order to give them the long growing season they need. Others, such as fast-growing beetroot and salads can be started off early so that you can enjoy them in late spring and early summer – keep sowing them every few weeks to extend the harvest.
Tender crops like aubergines need to be sown under glass, either in a greenhouse or on a sunny windowsill. Hardier crops like beetroot and broad beans can be sown directly into the ground outdoors, just don’t sow if the ground is frosty or covered in snow. Find out which crops you can sow in March, below.
1.Aubergines, chillies and tomatoes In the unpredictable British climate, tomatoes, chillies and aubergines need a long growing season in order to produce a good crop – so start them off early. Sow under glass for the best results.
2.Broad beans Broad beans are a welcome crop in early summer, and can be sown outdoors in March. Watch out for blackfly as the plants grow – pinch out the growing tip, where they congregate.
3.Beetroot Beetroot will germinate in low temperatures, so can be sown direct outdoors in March. Harvest when the beets have reached golf ball size.
4.Swiss chard Swiss chard is a beautiful crop for a sunny or partially shaded spot. Sow direct outside from March onwards.
5.Salad Start sowing salads from March onwards, and you’ll be enjoying tasty leaves for months to come. In March, they are best sown indoors.
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莹723
03-01
莹723
Though it’s still too cold to direct sow seeds outside, there are plenty that you can start off inside in February. A propagator is ideal if you have one, though a warm, bright windowsill is fine, too. By sowing seeds early on in the year, you can be enjoying beautiful blooms and tasty crops for a larger part of the year. The season of interest can then be extended by carrying out repeated sowings from March onwards.
Once your seeds have grown into young plants and are ready to go out outside see our guide to the best cold frames to help you harden your plants before they go in the ground. 1.Cosmos Cosmos are easy flowers to grow and they look great in borders or meadows. Go for annuals like Cosmos bipinnatus or C. sulphureus, and choose single-flowered varieties like ‘Fizzy Pink’ to please pollinators. The seeds need light to germinate, so sow on top of seed compost in a tray, then prick out when large enough to handle.
2.Kale Red kale is very hardy, but kale seeds need to be started off indoors during winter. Sow them indoors in modules or 7cm pots, with 2-3 seeds per module, then thin to leave the healthiest seedling.
3.Sweet peas Pink sweet pea ‘First Flame’Sweet peas provide a heady summer scent and growing them from seed couldn’t be easier. Biodegradable pots or cardboard tubes are best, as they allow the sweet peas to be planted out in their containers. Sow individually then place on a sunny windowsill, in a greenhouse, or in a heated propagator.
4.Tomatoes Sowing tomato seeds in a tray in a propagator or on a sunny windowsill, tomatoes should germinate within two weeks. Sow tomato seeds in pots of seed compost, or in trays, and place in a heated propagator or on a warm windowsill, keeping the compost moist.
5.Salvias Vivid blue Salvia patens, like this Salvia patens, are great for providing structure and height in the garden, and can be grown in borders or containers. Sow the seeds under cover in February, on top of seed compost. Cover the seeds with a fine layer of compost, then grow in a light, warm spot, keeping the compost moist. Other salvias you could sow in February include Salvia splendens and Salvia farinacea.
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莹723
02-24
莹723
If your home is suffering from a sense of drab lifelessness, what it probably needs are a few plants. From adorable succulents to kitchen herbs, every home feels warmer and more welcoming with a few indoor plants. One of the most popular living room plants for decades have been graceful ficuses or figs, with their glossy leaves and light gray trunks. Though they typically grow to about 10 feet tall indoors, in the wild, certain species can reach heights of 60 feet tall! Sometimes the trunks of ficus trees are twisted or braided or trained as a bonsai. With the right care, a ficus tree can live for about 20 years.”
Here’s how to care for a ficus tree, plus everything else you need to know about this popular (but somewhat finicky!) houseplant. 1,How much light does my ficus tree need? As a tropical plant, a ficus tree, also called "weeping fig," need lots of bright indirect light. Place it near your brightest windows, typically south- or west-facing, or give it supplemental light with a grow light. Once it’s situated, leave it be. It’s a little fussy and doesn’t respond well to changes. Ficus trees will sulk by dropping leaves anytime light levels or temperatures change. It also drops leaves seasonally, so be prepared with a good dustpan.
2.How do I care for a ficus tree? Typically, a new ficus will come in a black plastic pot with drain holes. Simply place it into a pretty, decorative clay planter. The plant shouldn't need repotting for several years. To water your ficus, simply give it a good soaking and let it dry out before watering again. If you overwater, the leaves will turn yellow and drop. If you underwater, the green leaves will begin to drop. A way to judge whether it’s time to water is to tip the pot and feel its weight; if it’s really light, it’s probably time to give it a drink. You’ll get the hang of it after a few weeks. After watering, always dump out any water that gathers in the tray beneath the pot; no plant likes soggy feet.
To feed your ficus tree give it a liquid all-purpose fertilizer during its growing season from April to September. The sticky sap may irritate tummies, so keep this plant away from curious pets who like to nibble on houseplants. Occasionally, dust or spray its leaves with a damp cloth or a gentle spray from the shower head.
3.Can I take my ficus plant outdoors in summer? You can, but it’s not the best idea. For starters, it will likely drop leaves, being the diva that it is! It also can’t cook in hot sun, so you would need to find a shady spot. Finally, you’ll have to bring it indoors before the night temperatures drop into the 50s in the fall. Take it aside, and spray it with neem oil about a week before you bring it in to kill any hitchhikers such as aphids, scale, mealy bugs, or spider mites, that potentially could infest your other indoor plants. Also, expect it to drop leaves again when it comes inside until it readjusts to the light levels indoors.
4.Does the ficus tree have any particular problems? Keep an eye out for an infestation of scale insects. These insects have a waxy exterior appearance, and you might see them attached to leaf surfaces. There’s also a sticky substance called honeydew, which you’ll find on your table or floor, that’s excreted by the scale when feeding. Try controlling a minor infestation by using a soft cloth dipped in warm, soapy water to wipe these insects away. If that’s has too much work, treat an insecticidal soap or neem oil. Retreat in 10 days.
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莹723
02-21
莹723
Whether you're growing fruits and veggies or herbs and flowers, edging is the finishing touch for any type of garden. By placing edging around garden beds full of annual flowers and perennials, they'll look more polished and your mulch will stay in place. Plus, it will add character and charm to your home's curb appeal.
Installing garden edging also takes some effort! Get your tools together first, including gardening gloves, an edging shovel, garden spade, rake and kneeler pad. Here are some of the best materials for edging your garden beds. 1.Paver Stones Pavers made from concrete are nearly indestructible. But they're heavy to handle and time-consuming to install, so plan on a few days of heavy carrying and digging. You can make paths with pavers, or just use them for edging beds. Pros: Lasts forever and very attractive Cons: Time-consuming to install
2.Woven Willow Also called "wattle," this natural edge is perfect for English or country gardens. It's used extensively in Europe. Pros: Beautiful in the right setting Cons: Easily damaged and pricey for large areas
3.Natural Rock Rocks are available in an array of sizes, colors, and shapes, and creeping flowers look amazing tumbling over them! Simply line the edges of each bed, but opt for rocks that are the size of a soft ball or larger for the most visual impact. Visit a nursery or garden center for options. Pros: Lasts forever Cons: Takes time to fit them together in a pleasing way
4.Brick Lay bricks in a shallow trench on their side with the wide side down, or stand them upright. The hardest part is getting everything level. Hint: Use a rubber mallet and line level on a string. Pros: Lasts forever, relatively inexpensive Cons: Labor-intensive to install
5.Poured Concrete This is typically not a DIY job for newbies, as you must build a form, then mix and pour concrete into the mold. Consider hiring an expert, because mistakes are not easily fixed. Pros: Lasts a long time Cons: Can’t easily adjust the layout of the planting bed in future years
6.Recycled Rubber Edging A few companies now make rubber edging that’s pounded into place. It’s nearly indestructible, as it’s usually made from recycled tires. Pros: Lasts a lifetime Cons: Doesn’t look great in formal or cottage gardens
7.Landscape Timber If you’re handy with a saw, landscape timbers are a cost-effective method of edging. They're often pressure-treated to prevent rotting. You’ll need to level the ground and cut sections as needed. Pros: Inexpensive and long-lasting Cons: Cannot be used to create curved borders
8.Decorative Fence Small sections of fence are super-easy for lining a garden perimeter. Many different types and sizes exist including metal, wood, and plastic, so you’ll find the one that suits your garden’s style. Pros: Easy to place Cons: Easily damaged, doesn't hold mulch in place
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莹723
02-18
莹723
The rubber tree is a great starter plant for anyone who's not known for having a green thumb. These trees have glossy, leathery leaves and an attractive upright form, which makes a nice addition to any room with sufficient light. In the jungles of India and Malaysia, this plant can grow up to 100 feet tall. But indoors, a rubber tree typically tops out at 6 to 10 feet tall. They’re fast growers with the right conditions and can last 15 years or more with proper care. Like the snake plant and spider plant, which are also low-maintenance plants, rubber trees look good with little effort from you!
Here's what else you need to know about this old favorite. 1.What kinds of rubber trees can I grow? Rubber tree, also known by its scientific name 'Ficus elastica' is available in many different varieties. ‘Decora’ has the classic dark green leaves with white ribs. ‘Doescheri’ is a pretty variegated variety. ‘Rubra’ has pretty burgundy leaves. But no matter which one you choose, they all need similar care.
2.Where can I buy a rubber tree? Because it’s an old favorite, you’ll find rubber trees at most nurseries, big box stores, and online retailers. If shopping in person, don't buy plants without lower leaves, which drop off if it’s been overwatered or otherwise stressed. Also, choose one that is glossy and upright, not falling over. They're relatively inexpensive compared to other houseplants of similar size, such as the fiddleleaf fig or the ficus tree, also called weeping fig.
3.Rubber trees need bright light. Rubber trees like bright light, although they can adjust to lower light levels. They don’t like sudden drops in temperature, so don’t put them too close to drafty windows. If your room seems dark, get a grow light to provide overhead light so the plant can grow upright. Otherwise, they tend to get leggy as they stretch toward the light. It's not necessary but if you decide to put them outdoors in the summer, keep them out of direct sunlight. Bring them indoors again before a frost. In USDA Hardiness zones 10 and 11 (find your zone here), you can leave your plants outdoors unless freezing weather is forecast.
4.It's easy to care for your rubber tree. The great news is that rubber trees don't need a lot of fussing over. Water your rubber tree when the soil is slightly dry to the touch. Watering too often may cause leaf yellowing. Dump out the saucer beneath the pot so there's no standing water. If you like, feed your rubber tree with a general-purpose fertilizer at 1/4 to 1/2 strength a few times a year, especially during active growth in spring and summer. Or not! It's really not necessary but certainly won't hurt.
5.Is rubber tree safe around pets? The sticky sap may irritate a pet's skin or tummy, so it’s best to keep this plant away from curious pets who like to nibble on houseplants. To keep your rubber tree clean and shiny, dust the broad leaves with a damp rag occasionally. Rubber trees rarely are affected by bugs or diseases, so they’re the perfect plant for you to sit back and enjoy without a lot of fussing.
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莹723
02-17
莹723
Sowing seeds is something that some gardeners avoid, but it’s easy when you know how. You just need to give seeds the right conditions, and they’ll germinate. Germination is triggered by the correct combination of light levels, temperature and moisture – get these right, and the seed will start to grow. We show you when and where to sow all kinds of seeds, indoors and outdoors, in this sowing guide.
1.Hardy annuals Including: calendula, cornflower, nasturtium, poppy, sunflower, sweet pea. Sow under glass: Feb-Mar (soil temp 8-12°C). Sow outdoors: Mar-April (soil temp 6-12°C).
2.Hardy salads and veg Including: beetroot, broad bean, chard, lettuce, pea, spring onion, radish, rocket. Sow under glass: Feb-April (soil temp 10-18°C). Sow outdoors: March-Sep (soil temp 8-18°C).
3.Half-hardy flowers Including: cosmos, lobelia, morning glory, nicotiana, snapdragon. Sow under glass: Mar (soil temp 16-24°C) – seeds must be sown indoors.
4.Tender perennials Including: begonias, dahlia, fuchsia, heliotrope, pelargonium, salvia. Sow under glass: Jan-Feb (soil temp 18-24°C) – must be sown under cover.
5.Frost-tender veg Including: aubergine, chillies, courgette, French/runner bean, pepper, pumpkin, sweetcorn, tomato. Sow under glass: April (soil temp 16-28°C). Sow outdoors: May-June (soil temp at least 10°C).
6.Hardy perennials Including: aquilegia, delphinium, echinacea, hellebore, lupin, rudbeckia, verbascum. Sow under glass: Jan-Feb (soil temp 18-21°C). Sow outdoors: April-June (soil temp at least 10°C).
7.Polyanthus Including: campanula, forget-me-not, foxglove, polyanthus, sweet william, wallflower, winter pansy. Sow under glass: June (soil temp 12-18°C). Sow outdoors: April-June (soil temp 10-18°C).
8.Trees and shrubs Including: abutilon, acer, bonsai, cotoneaster, cytisus (broom), hawthorn, sorbus. Sow under glass: Sep-Mar (soil temp 4-10°C). Sow outdoors: Sep-Mar (soil temp 0-12°C).
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